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California LLC Incentive for 2021

For those struggling with income for the past year, seeking employment can be challenging. Especially for an economy with some uncertainty between COVID-19 and business shutdowns. Luckily, with Governor Newsome's new Budget Act, a beacon of hope has appeared in these dark times for new business owners. As bitter as it has been to lose so many local businesses in California, within a six to twelve month period, since the beginning of the pandemic, providing this incentive may, hopefully, bring life back into the cities decimated by this plague. According to ca.gov , "...the Budget provides...$75 million for loan loss mitigation and reducing the cost of capital for small businesses to address gaps in available federal assistance. These funds will be administered by the California Infrastructure and Economic Development Bank. The Budget also expands the $800 Minimum Franchise Tax exemption for first-year corporations to all businesses – removing a barrier to small business creati

Notary Public: Virtual or Local

In the recent months, virtual notary has been on the rise. From real estate to wills, clients have been hiring Notary Publics with a touch a button. No longer do you need a person to meet and greet, at a local cafe. No. Now, you can do it at the safe space of your choice: home, work, or even abroad. The convenience is at the client's advantage.

But, as for Notary Public themselves, the trouble has just begun. Unlike buying a simple journal and stamps for one's profession, for about a one time payment of $200 or less, Notaries may find themselves paying $500 or more annually to go virtual. Much like photography and the software Photoshop, one's career has taken a leap from present to omni-present, thanks to technology's exponential growth online. For when one firm uses one software, a client may use another software, and many other companies operate on neither but their own, a Notary is out of commission until they can afford any, if not all of their clients' softwares of choice. This proves to be a conundrum for the Notary Public, as the highest price one can charge is $15 per signature, but only in California. Being that one software can reach nationwide, the Notary is typically under the agreement of $10 per signature, statewide. Depending on the state, that may either be gospel, or an insult one's value.  

But that's not all. 

Due to these unprecedented times, Notaries are able to take on their same duty, at the comfort of an Attorney's leisure. If they are unable to have the Court Reporter to swear the Deponent in properly, the Notary Public may do so - specifically, the videographer. Luckily, for those working with Courthouses, Counsels no longer have to worry about witnesses being sworn in-person. Notaries on video depositions are capable of managing this detail, allowing virtual cases to function without time or travel to waste.

Some deem virtual depositions as flawed, as internet feed may cut out, at times, and sound can be lost, more often than not. At court, everything is heard, clearly and concise. But, again, travel and time have made many a fan of this convenience - opening opportunities for newcomers to gain experience, and an advantage amongst those slow to adapt to electronic media.

The expense may grow for firms and Notary Publics, with this venture into virtual law, but the upside to it is that there are more jobs available for everyone to finish. Cases pile up, but now, they can all be done with ease, on schedule, and, sometimes, closed faster than ever before. 

But, then again, if it wasn't broken, why fix it? The choice is yours.

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